Ankasa
The Ankasa Conservation Area lies in Southwest Ghana on the border with the Ivory Coast. Covering 509km2, this Protected Area falls within an ancient rainforest and is the most biodiverse in Ghana. It represents the only wet evergreen protected area in almost unspoiled state. It is home to over 800 plant species, including some endemic ones like the recently discovered Psychotria.
The forest still holds viable populations of large and charismatic mammals, such as the Forest Elephant, Bongo, Leopard, and Yellow-backed Duiker. Primates are represented six confirmed and 3 unconfirmed species, including Western Chimpanzee and 3 rare
or endangered subspecies endemic to Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana: Roloway Diana Monkey, Geoffroy’s Pied Colobus and White-naped Sooty Mangabey. The area has an impressive bird list of over 200 species, the majority of these being truly forest dependant. Several rare birds endemic to the Upper Guinea Forest, e.g. White-breasted Guinea Fowl Agelastes meleagrides, Yellow-throated Olive Greenbul and Rufous-winged Illadopsis are found in the area.
The extensive network of smaller streams, together with the 3 main rivers of the Protected Area similarly supports a variety of reptiles including the Broad-fronted Crocodile.
Over 600 butterfly species with many endemic species have been recorded, and the network of streams in the area is an important breeding ground for many of the fish species in the region as well as being of an important watershed for the rivers west and south of the Protected Area With many yet-to-be discovered plants and animal species, Ankasa offers a virgin laboratory for scientists and students. Its quiet milieu is equally conducive for religious and recreational tourism.

The following is an overview of the existing attractions in the wetland:

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  • What to Do
  • What to Eat and Where to Stay
  • Getting There
  • Fact File
   
Visitor facilities
The visitor information centre is located some 100 metres from the main gate. Staff are in place to provide necessary information to visitors.

Nature Walk

Although over 10km of the park is motorable, it is best enjoyed through guided walks. Five tourist trails enable the visitors to feel the rain forest. Although forest animals are difficult to see (because of the closed vegetation), visitors can hear calls from many species, especially monkeys who can sometimes be seen jumping from tree to tree in the canopy.
Interesting sights to visit include:

The Bamboo Cathedral

The spectacular Bamboo Cathedral is located at Nkwanta about 8km from the Ankasa gate of the Park. Though not a church building and has no human Bishop, a priest nor a creed, the site showcases nature’s perfect architectural design. The Bamboo Cathedral has become a very popular site for visitors. This site offers a quite environment for visitors.

  • The Water Falls

The Ankasa rainforest serves as shed for many streams and rivers. Three of them from which the forest derives its name are the Ankasa, Nini and Suhien. The fascinating characteristics of these rivers are the rapids found on them. The breezes along the rivers and rattling noise of the rapids are a delight to tourists. The potential for canoeing is being explored.

  • The Big tree

The “Big Tree” (Tieghemella) is one of the tallest trees in Ankasa forest. Towering well over 20 metres, this tree offers a unique opportunity to see what a good rainforest can have as trees. This species is commonly used by forest elephants to scratch their thick skin and visitors might be changed to see recent signs of elephant scratch or might even be lucky enough to see an elephant in the rarely seen act

 

Fees

Entrance fees in the table that follows vary depending on the nationality, age, duration of stay and means of locomotion.
If in doubt please contact the park for details.

CATEGORY “B” PARKS  ANKASA) GHANAIANS
GH¢
NON-GHANAIANS
GH¢
Adults 3.00 6.00
Students/Pupils 1.00 2.50
GUIDE FEES/PERSON/HOUR:    
Adults 2.00 3.00
Students/Pupils Free 3.00
     
B.  ALL PARKS:    
BIRDING:    
Birding 1 Day 5.00 20.00
Birding 2 Days 7.00 30.00
Birding 3+ Days 10.00 50.00
     
C.  VEHICLE ENTRY FEES: Ghanaian Registered Foreign Registered
Cars 2.00 10.00
Minibus 3.00 15.00
Bus 4.00 20,00
Pick-ups / 4WDs 4.00 20.00
     
D.  CAMPING SITE FEES:    
Undeveloped (cleared open & sanitized space)   5.00
Nkwanta camp chalets: self-catering kitchen with cooker, utensils and crockery   15.00
     
E.  COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY / FILMING:    
Still cameras up to 3 days   200.00
Every extra day thereafter   50.00
Video/cine cameras up to 3 days   500.00
Every extra day thereafter   100.00
     
F.  RESEARCH IN PROTECTED AREAS: Ghanaian Researchers Foreign Researchers
Short-Term (1 month - or part of) Free US$100 or equivalent
Medium Term (2 - 6 months) - US$300 or equivalent
Long-Term (7 months – 1 year) - US$600 or equivalent
FOREIGN RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS:    
Short-Term (1 month or part of)   US$300 or equivalent
Medium Term (2 - 6 months)   US$500 or equivalent
Long-Term (7 months – 1 year)   US$1,000 or equivalent
GUIDE/GUARD ALLOWANCE:    
Guide/Guard Overnight Allowance   GH¢25.00
   
 
 

Ankasa Conservation Area

Ghana Tourist Board

P.O. Box 102, Elubo,

Head Office

Ghana.

P.O. Box 3106 Accra

Tel: +233-(0) 3192395

Tel: +233 (0)21 222153/258730

 

Email : gtb@africaonline.com.gh

 

Web : http://www.touringghana.com

Wildlife Division Regional Office
P.O. Box TD 484,
Takoradi,
Ghana.
Tel: +233 (0) 031 25322 / 26945
Fax: +233 (0) 031 25327

 

 

The entrance road to the park is located at Sowodadzem, 120 km from Takoradi 22 km from Elubo along the Takoradi-Elubo section of the Ghana-Côte d’Ivoire International highway. Visitors have various options to get to the park, from using private vehicles, public transport (locally called “tro-tro”) or taxis. There are plans to station bicycles at Sowodadzem (6km from the park entrance) for backpackers.

 

  1. Ankasa Conservation Area became a protected area in 1934.
  2. The people living in the fringe communities belong to the Nzema ethnic group. They are mostly peasant farmers, mainly cultivating cassava and cocoa.
  3. There are many medicinal plants within the conservation area, including sugarplum and mahogany.
  4. The Ankasa Conservation Area is divided into two by the Suhien River. The Nini River constitutes the northern border of the conservation area.
  5. The word ‘Ankasa’ means ‘don’t talk’. It is said that long ago, the area around the Ankasa River was inhabited by hostile dwarves who kidnapped strangers and threw them into the river. To prevent kidnappings, people were advised to keep quiet as they approached the river. Hence the name ‘Ankasa’.
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